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Groups

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Discussion Group for Cracked Teeth

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Discussion Group for Dental Decay

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Discussion Group for Flouride for your Teeth

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Discussion group on Fear of Dentist

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Discussion group on Tobacco and your Oral Health

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Discussion Group on Chewing Gum and your Teeth

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Discussion Group on Oral Cancer

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Discussion Group on Mouth Guards

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Discussion Group on Dental X-Rays

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Discussion on Food for Your Teeth

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Discussion on Tooth Sensitivity

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Discussion Group on Dental Flossing

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Discussion on Gingivitis 

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Effects of vaping to your Dental Health

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Dentin: The hard tissue of the tooth that surrounds the central core of nerves and blood vessels (pulp).

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Discussion on Dental Implants

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Dental cavities are holes in teeth caused by tooth decay. Cavities are also referred to as caries. What are microcavities?Teeth are in an environment of constant acid attack that strips the teeth of ...

Dental cavities are holes in teeth caused by tooth decay. Cavities are also referred to as caries.

What are microcavities?
Teeth are in an environment of constant acid attack that strips the teeth of important minerals and breaks the teeth down. While this attack is constantly occurring, minerals are also be constantly replenished through mineral-rich saliva and fluoridated water and toothpaste. In addition to fluoride, calcium and phosphate also help to remineralize enamel. When the demineralization starts and is confined to the outermost layer of enamel, it is called a microcavity, or incipient cavity. These types of cavities rarely need anything more than very conservative treatment. Only when the cavity breaks through the enamel layer and into the dentin does it really threaten the tooth. So when these microcavities are detected, it is best to try a remineralization protocol to see if they can be reversed instead of jumping to a filling right away. A dentist will help in determining the most effective conservative treatment for these early cavities.

The dentist's goal is to achieve a healthy balance between prevention and restoration. It is a balance between being proactive and reactive. The dentist doesn't want to be so proactive that he is recommending things that don't need to be done -- preventing problems that realistically never would have occurred. But he doesn't want to be so reactive that he simply watches small problems become big problems. One mistake people often make is waiting for pain to dictate the timing of treatment. Once a tooth starts hurting, it is often too late for remineralization or a small filling. Pain usually indicates a need for root canal treatment, a crown, or tooth extraction. There is some variability in how dentists will treat microcavities and when they determine a filling is necessary. Some people are more prone to caries than others. Analyzing one's history of cavities, current diet, and oral hygiene may lead the dentist to be more aggressive or more conservative with his recommendations. This is why it is important that each person finds a dentist that echoes his or her own philosophy regarding aggressive versus conservative dental treatment.

Regardless of the dentist, regular returns to the dentist are key to being conservative so the cavity can be monitored and treated before it grows too much. Small cavities can become root canals within a year under the right circumstances. As a cavity grows, more tooth structure is lost. Lost tooth structure leads to a greater likelihood of fractured teeth, recurrent decay, and tooth loss. When possible, one is always better off getting a small filling than ending up with a large filling, a root canal, or a crown.

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  Teeth Grinding (Bruxism)   What is teeth grinding?Teeth grinding is a condition whereby one excessively grinds or clenches their teeth. Typically grinding and clenching occurs mostly wh...

 

Teeth Grinding (Bruxism)

 

What is teeth grinding?
Teeth grinding is a condition whereby one excessively grinds or clenches their teeth. Typically grinding and clenching occurs mostly when sleeping but some individuals may grind and clench during the day also. Teeth grinding is also referred to as bruxism.

 

What are the dangers of teeth grinding?
Teeth grinding can create numerous problems such as local muscular pain, headaches, loss of tooth structure, gum recession, loose teeth, shortening of teeth, tooth sensitivity, cracked and broken teeth, damage to the bone structure of the jaw joint with temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ syndrome), and even facial changes. Children that grind due to a breathing airway problem can have developmental issues.

 

What causes teeth grinding?
The exact cause of teeth grinding is not totally understood and there are numerous different theories. However, there is a link to breathing airway issues, such as sleep apnea, jaw posture positions, tooth position, dental work that has changed jaw position or tooth positions, abnormal bite, trauma, repetitive strain, lifestyle activities, as well as emotional and developmental issues.

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When a tooth persistently throbs and keeps you up at night with pain, it could be something more worrisome than a simple toothache. An abscessed tooth is an infection within a tooth that has spread to...

When a tooth persistently throbs and keeps you up at night with pain, it could be something more worrisome than a simple toothache. An abscessed tooth is an infection within a tooth that has spread to the root tip or around the root. This infection originates from the tooth's inner chamber, which is called the "pulp chamber." Contained within the pulp chamber are blood vessels and nerves, collectively called the "pulp." Prior to the formation of an abscess, the tooth has essentially lost its ability to fight off infection, and bacteria are able to invade the pulp chamber and multiply. As the bacteria multiply, the bacterial infection usually spreads from the pulp chamber and exits through the bottom of the root into the bone. The abscess is a collection of pus that is made up of dead white blood cells, tissue debris, and bacteria.

A tooth abscess differs from a gum abscess by the source of the original infection. The tooth abscess (or "periapical abscess") originates from the pulp of the tooth and exits out the tooth's apex at the bottom of the root. A gum abscess (or "periodontal abscess") starts in a gum pocket outside of the tooth next to the root from gum disease. Treatment will depend on where the infection originates.

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Discussion Group for Bad Breath   Bad breath, also known as Halitosis, may be a result of poor dental health habits and may be a sign of other health problems. Bad...

Discussion Group for Bad Breath

 

Bad breath, also known as Halitosis, may be a result of poor dental health habits and may be a sign of other health problems. Bad breath can also be made worse by the types of foods you eat and other unhealthy lifestyle habits.

  1.   For Consumer
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What is Orthognathic Surgery? Orthognathic Surgery is jaw surgery or surgery to correct the function of the jaw. It is performed to help patients bite correctly, to correct underbites or overbites, s...

What is Orthognathic Surgery?

Orthognathic Surgery is jaw surgery or surgery to correct the function of the jaw. It is performed to help patients bite correctly, to correct underbites or overbites, speak with clarity and, sometimes, to help them breathe more easily. The procedure can take up to two to four hours.

Is Orthognathic Surgery painful?

Orthognathic Surgery is performed under general anaesthesia and patients should not feel pain during the procedure.

How long does recovery after Orthognathic Surgery take?

Patients take one to four weeks to recover from jaw surgery for a single jaw. They may take six to eight weeks to recover from double jaw surgery. Recovery depends on each individual patient. Patients should not travel by air until cleared to do so by their surgeon.

What post-operative care is required after Orthognathic Surgery?

Patients should sleep on their backs with their head elevated for at least a week. They should try to talk and exercise their jaw. They should take short walks. They should not do strenuous exercises or lift heavy objects for at least two months after surgery. They can place hot or cold packs on the swollen area to bring down any swelling.  They should take all the prescribed medications correctly.   

What are the alternatives to Orthognathic Surgery?

Alternatives to Orthognathic Surgery include surgically placing facial implants, anti-aging injectables, orthodontic bite correction, using braces, or nonsurgical overbite and underbite correction using other dental techniques.

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Discussion Group on Dental Bonding in Malaysia

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Discussion Group on Orthodontic Retainer in Malaysia

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Discussion Group on Snap on Smile in Malaysia

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Discussion on Dental Fillings in Malaysia

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Discussion Group on Dental Bridges in Malaysia

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Discussion Group on Gum Diseases and Surgery 

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Discussion Group on Cosmetic Dental Consultation

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Group Discussion for Dentures

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Discussion Group for Invisalign

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Discussion Group of Sleep Apnea

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Discussion Group on Dental Crowns

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Discussion Group for Wisdom Tooth Extraction

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Discussion Group for Teeth Cleaning - Prophylaxis

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Discussion Group for Root Canal

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Discussion Group for Veneers

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Discussion on Orthodontist Consultation for patients

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Discussion on Ulcers for Oral Health

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Teeth Whitening for Malaysians

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This is a group for discussion on Braces, what you need to know etc. 

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Anything about Dental Health for Malaysian Senior Citizens

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All about Dental Health for Malaysian AdultsĀ 

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All about Dental Health for Malaysian Teenagers

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Anything about Dental Health for Kids

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